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Remote Data Center Encryption for Your SAP HANA Log Data

SaSoe

By: SaSoe

August 21, 2017 6:48 am

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Every single data area processed in SAP HANA is highly sensitive. To safeguard against security threats, SAP HANA includes a built-in feature that encrypts the vast majority of accrued data, known as data volumes, on the SAP HANA server’s hard drive. However, there is no built-in way to encrypt the log files that record ongoing changes to the SAP HANA database, which are used to ensure that the current data set can be restored in the event of an error, such as a system failure. You can use standard file system encryption technology, but you would need to manually enter the decryption key before SAP HANA can start up.

To help SAP customers extend the direct encryption capability provided for data volumes to include log files, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications provides a remote data center encryption function that enables you to encrypt SAP HANA log files directly on the server’s hard drive.

Learn how to extend the direct encryption capabilities provided for data volumes to include log volumes using a remote data center encryption function. Read the full article by Hannes Kuehnemund

SUSE  delivers  the  remote  data  center  encryption function with Service Pack 2 for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server  for  SAP  Applications  12,  which  was  initially released in November 2016. In addition to SAP HANA, the new encryption function can be used to boost the data  security  of  a  variety  of  other  SAP  and  non-SAP  applications.

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Categories: Alliance Partners, Expert Views, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications, Technical Solutions

Disclaimer: As with everything else in the SUSE Blog, this content is definitely not supported by SUSE (so don't even think of calling Support if you try something and it blows up).  It was contributed by a community member and is published "as is." It seems to have worked for at least one person, and might work for you. But please be sure to test, test, test before you do anything drastic with it.

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