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SUSE Linux Containers – Native on Windows Server



By: ecolman

April 18, 2017 8:00 am

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Microsoft is investing in Linux containers on Windows Server — and if security and containers are important to you — keep on reading. At DockerCon today, Microsoft demonstrated support for Linux containers running natively on Windows Server through Hyper-V isolation technology.  SUSE is excited to be a part of this announcement and will actively collaborate with Microsoft to enable our joint customers with SUSE-based Hyper-V isolated containers that run natively on Windows Server.

Why isolate containers inside a VM?

The path for Microsoft towards helping build an industry-standard cross platform container runtime and enabling native SUSE Linux containers on Windows Server also enables some valuable security benefits. Through Hyper-V isolation, running one VM per container provides kernel isolation capabilities, enabling enhanced security. The solution provides further capability to regulate workloads and increase performance with file-cache sharing, cloning, and benefits of a single file space.
For customers concerned about multi-tenancy, hyper-scale web apps, or those customers who may be exposed to malicious kernel attacks that could target other containerized apps– VM isolated containers should be a valuable feature.

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Disclaimer: As with everything else in the SUSE Blog, this content is definitely not supported by SUSE (so don't even think of calling Support if you try something and it blows up).  It was contributed by a community member and is published "as is." It seems to have worked for at least one person, and might work for you. But please be sure to test, test, test before you do anything drastic with it.

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