41.2 Collecting System Information with Supportconfig

To create a TAR archive with detailed system information that you can hand over to Global Technical Support, use either:

  • the command supportconfig or,

  • the YaST Support module.

The command line tool is provided by the package supportutils which is installed by default. The YaST Support module is also based on the command line tool.

Depending on which packages are installed on your system, some of these packages integrate Supportconfig plug-ins. When Supportconfig is executed, all plug-ins are executed as well and create one or more result files for the archive. That has the benefit that the only topics checked are those that contain a specific plug-in for them. Supportconfig plug-ins are stored in the directory /usr/lib/supportconfig/plugins/.

41.2.1 Creating a Service Request Number

Supportconfig archives can be generated at any time. However, for handing over the Supportconfig data to Global Technical Support, you need to generate a service request number first. You will need it to upload the archive to support.

To create a service request, go to https://scc.suse.com/support/requests and follow the instructions on the screen. Write down your 12-digit service request number.

NOTE: Privacy Statement

SUSE and Micro Focus treat system reports as confidential data. For details about our privacy commitment, see https://www.suse.com/company/policies/privacy/.

41.2.2 Upload Targets

After having created a service request number, you can upload your Supportconfig archives to Global Technical Support as described in Submitting Information to Support with YaST or Submitting Information to Support from Command Line. Use one of the following upload targets:

Alternatively, you can manually attach the TAR archive to your service request using the service request URL: https://scc.suse.com/support/requests.

41.2.3 Creating a Supportconfig Archive with YaST

To use YaST to gather your system information, proceed as follows:

  1. Start YaST and open the Support module.

  2. Click Create report tarball.

  3. In the next window, select one of the Supportconfig options from the radio button list. Use Custom (Expert) Settings is preselected by default. If you want to test the report function first, use Only gather a minimum amount of info. For some background information on the other options, refer to the supportconfig man page.

    Proceed with Next.

  4. Enter your contact information. It will be written to a file called basic-environment.txt and included in the archive to be created.

  5. If you want to submit the archive to Global Technical Support at the end of the information collection process, Upload Information is required. YaST automatically proposes an upload server. If you want to modify it, refer to Section 41.2.2, Upload Targets for details of which upload servers are available.

    If you want to submit the archive later on, you can leave the Upload Information empty for now.

  6. Proceed with Next.

  7. The information gathering begins.

    After the process is finished, continue with Next.

  8. Review the data collection: Select the File Name of a log file to view its contents in YaST. To remove any files you want excluded from the TAR archive before submitting it to support, use Remove from Data. Continue with Next.

  9. Save the TAR archive. If you started the YaST module as root user, by default YaST proposes to save the archive to /var/log (otherwise, to your home directory). The file name format is nts_HOST_DATE_TIME.tbz.

  10. If you want to upload the archive to support directly, make sure Upload log files tarball to URL is activated. The Upload Target shown here is the one that YaST proposes in Step 5. If you want to modify the upload target, find detailed information of which upload servers are available in Section 41.2.2, Upload Targets.

  11. If you want to skip the upload, deactivate Upload log files tarball to URL.

  12. Confirm your changes to close the YaST module.

41.2.4 Creating a Supportconfig Archive from Command Line

The following procedure shows how to create a Supportconfig archive, but without submitting it to support directly. For uploading it, you need to run the command with certain options as described in Submitting Information to Support from Command Line.

  1. Open a shell and become root.

  2. Run supportconfig. Usually, it is enough to run this tool without any options. Some options are very common and are displayed in the following list:

    -E MAIL , -N NAME , -O COMPANY , -P PHONE

    Sets your contact data: e-mail address (-E), company name (-O), your name (-N), and your phone number (-P).

    -i KEYWORDS , -F

    Limits the features to check. The placeholder KEYWORDS is a comma separated list of case-sensitive keywords. Get a list of all keywords with supportconfig -F.

    -r SRNUMBER

    Defines your service request number when uploading the generated TAR archive.

  3. Wait for the tool to complete the operation.

  4. The default archive location is /var/log, with the file name format being nts_HOST_DATE_TIME.tbz

41.2.5 Understanding the Output of supportconfig

Whether you run supportconfig through YaST or directly, the script gives you a summary of what it did.

                     Support Utilities - Supportconfig
                          Script Version: 3.0-98 
                          Script Date: 2017 06 01
[...]
Gathering system information
  Data Directory:    /var/log/nts_d251_180201_1525 

  Basic Server Health Check...                 Done 
  RPM Database...                              Done 
  Basic Environment...                         Done 
  System Modules...                            Done 
[...]
  File System List...                          Skipped 
[...]
  Command History...                           Excluded 
[...]
  Supportconfig Plugins:                       1 
    Plugin: pstree...                          Done
[...]
Creating Tar Ball

==[ DONE ]===================================================================
  Log file tar ball: /var/log/nts_d251_180201_1525.tbz 
  Log file size:     732K
  Log file md5sum:   bf23e0e15e9382c49f92cbce46000d8b
=============================================================================

The temporary data directory to store the results. This directory is archived as tar file, see .

The feature was enabled (either by default or selected manually) and executed successfully. The result is stored in a file (see Table 41-1).

The feature was skipped because some files of one or more RPM packages were changed.

The feature was excluded because it was deselected via the -x option.

The script found one plug-in and executes the plug-in pstree. The plug-in was found in the directory /usr/lib/supportconfig/plugins/. See the man page for details.

The tar file name of the archive, by default compressed with bzip2.

41.2.6 Common Supportconfig Options

The supportconfig utility is usually called without any options. Display a list of all options with supportconfig -h or refer to the man page. The following list gives a brief overview of some common use cases:

Reducing the Size of the Information Being Gathered

Use the minimal option (-m):

tux > sudo supportconfig -m
Limiting the Information to a Specific Topic

If you have already localized a problem that relates to a specific area or feature set only, you should limit the collected information to the specific area for the next supportconfig run. For example, if you detected problems with LVM and want to test a recent change that you did to the LVM configuration. In that case it makes sense to gather the minimum Supportconfig information around LVM only:

tux > sudo supportconfig -i LVM

Additional keywords can be separated through commas. For example, an additional disk test:

tux > sudo supportconfig -i LVM,DISK

For a complete list of feature keywords that you can use for limiting the collected information to a specific area, run:

tux > sudo supportconfig -F
Including Additional Contact Information in the Output:
tux > sudo supportconfig -E tux@example.org -N "Tux Penguin" -O "Penguin Inc." ...

(all in one line)

Collecting Already Rotated Log Files
tux > sudo supportconfig -l

This is especially useful in high logging environments or after a kernel crash when syslog rotates the log files after a reboot.

41.2.7 Overview of the Archive Content

The TAR archive contains all the results from the features. Depending on what you have selected (all or only a small set), the archive can contain more or less files. The set of features can be limited through the -i option (see Section 41.2.6, Common Supportconfig Options).

To list the content of the archive, use the following tar command:

root # tar xf /var/log/nts_earth_180131_1545.tbz

The following file names are always available inside the TAR archive:

Minimum Files in Archive
basic-environment.txt

Contains the date when this script was executed and system information like version of the distribution, hypervisor information, and more.

basic-health-check.txt

Contains some basic health checks like uptime, virtual memory statistics, free memory and hard disk, checks for zombie processes, and more.

hardware.txt

Contains basic hardware checks like information about the CPU architecture, list of all connected hardware, interrupts, I/O ports, kernel boot messages, and more.

messages.txt

Contains log messages from the system journal.

rpm.txt

Contains a list of all installed RPM packages, the name, where they are coming from, and their versions.

summary.xml

Contains some information in XML format like distribution, the version, and product specific fragments.

supportconfig.txt

Contains information about the supportconfig script itself.

y2log.txt

Contains YaST specific information like specific packages, configuration files, and log files.

Table 41-1 lists all available features and their file names. Further service packs can extend the list, as can plug-ins.

Table 41-1 Comparison of Features and File Names in the TAR Archive

Feature

File name

AFP

novell-afp.txt

APPARMOR

security-apparmor.txt

AUDIT

security-audit.txt

AUTOFS

fs-autofs.txt

BOOT

boot.txt

BTRFS

fs-btrfs.txt

DAEMONS

chkconfig.txt

CIFS

novell-cifs.txt

CIMOM

cimom.txt

CRASH

crash.txt

CRON

cron.txt

DFS

novell-dfs.txt

DHCP

dhcp.txt

DISK

fs-diskio.txt

DNS

dns.txt

DOCKER

cocker.txt

DRBD

drbd.txt

DSFW

novell-dsfw.txt

EDIR

novell-edir.txt

ENV

env.txt

ETC

etc.txt

EVMS

evms.txt

HA

ha.txt

HAPROXY

haproxy.txt

HISTORY

shell_history.txt

IB

ib.txt

IMAN

novell-iman.txt

ISCSI

fs-iscsi.txt

KVM

kvm.txt

LDAP

ldap.txt

LUM

novell-lum.txt

LVM

lvm.txt

LXC

lxc.txt

MEM

memory.txt

MOD

modules.txt

MPIO

mpio.txt

NCP

novell-ncp.txt

NCS

novell-ncs.txt

NET

network-*.txt

NFS

nfs.txt

NIT

novell-nit.txt

NSS

novell-nss.txt

NTP

ntp.txt

OCFS2

ocfs2.txt

OES

n/a

OFILES

open-files.txt

PAM

pam.txt

PRINT

print.txt

PROC

proc.txt

PROXY

novell-proxymgmt.txt

SAM

sam.txt

SAR

sar.txt

SLERT

slert.txt

SLP

slp.txt

SMT

smt.txt

SMART

fs-smartmon.txt

SMB

samba.txt

SMS

novell-sms.txt

SRAID

fs-softraid.txt

SSH

ssh.txt

SSSD

sssd.txt

SYSCONFIG

sysconfig.txt

SYSFS

sysfs.txt

UDEV

udev.txt

UFILES

fs-files-additional.txt

UP

updates.txt

UPD

updates-daemon.txt

WEB

web.txt

X

x.txt

XEN

xen.txt