SUSE Conversations


SUSE releases hardened 3.0-based kernel to the enterprise



By: Ralf Flaxa

February 29, 2012 4:05 am

Reads:261

Comments:0

Rating:0

Since the introduction of the first SUSE Linux Enterprise version in 2000 SUSE has always been a leader in turning the ever-growing stream of incredible Open Source innovation into rock solid releases of our SUSE Linux Enterprise product portfolio.

We live and actively participate in the open source community  every day, so we know exactly what makes this great development model work so well. At the same time we listen very carefully to the needs of our customers.

By fully understanding and appreciating both the open source community and our customers’ business needs, SUSE is able to apply “the translation skills” and “the secret sauce” needed to bring these two groups together. This win-win recipe is the DNA that is needed in a leading engineering organization today.

My engineers often joke they are “paid for their hobby,” which is advancing Linux and open source jointly with the upstream communities, while never forgetting the realities of mixed source environments our customers must live daily.

We care about what matters to our customers, we know exactly what it means to run mission-critical workloads, to maintain backwards compatibility and stability – even for very special customer scenarios or extended life cycles. This customer orientation, combined with excellent engineering processes is what really makes the difference and value of our premium quality “made by SUSE” enterprise products.

In celebration of Linux’ 20th anniversary, Linus Torvalds decided last year to have the successor of Linux kernel 2.6.39 be named 3.0. In his announcement he underlines that people shall not get confused about the major version number change and that there really are “no ABI changes, no API changes.” This means kernel 3.0 really provides you access to latest technology without breaking backward compatibility.

SUSE will celebrate its 20th anniversary  this year. Under the new ownership of The Attachmate Group, the independent, strengthened and agile SUSE, has embraced Linus’ theme and will bring to you the latest and greatest technology by releasing kernel 3.0, while maintaining ABI and API stability.

Olaf Kirch, engineering director responsible for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, will explain in a follow-on blog more details about how the change in upstream kernel development code streams has lead to a forward-looking development model that allows us to more closely follow the upstream development instead of the traditional and cumbersome “backport” approach.

Vojtech Pavlik, engineering director responsible for SUSE Labs and ultimately for the kernel at SUSE, will share with you examples of the benefits SUSE brings with this new kernel to all enterprise customers.

Together with our ecosystem of hardware and software partners we have been working very hard during the last couple of months to bring to you the best Linux kernel ever with SUSE Linux Enterprise 11 Service Pack 2.

Based on kernel version 3.0 and including latest drivers from version 3.2, we provide unmatched hardware support to enterprise customers, combined with a long list of new features and enhancements to accelerate your workloads, while guaranteeing compatibility, smooth migration and rock solid quality thanks to engineering “made by SUSE.”

I am very proud what my engineering team has put together and am sure you will enjoy the next generation Linux enterprise experience with SUSE Linux Enterprise 11 Service Pack 2, available on February 28, 2012. Evaluation copies can be downloaded from http://download.novell.com.

 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/5 (0 votes cast)

Tags:
Categories: Expert Views, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server

Disclaimer: As with everything else at SUSE Conversations, this content is definitely not supported by SUSE (so don't even think of calling Support if you try something and it blows up).  It was contributed by a community member and is published "as is." It seems to have worked for at least one person, and might work for you. But please be sure to test, test, test before you do anything drastic with it.

Comment

RSS