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Running SAP on Linux with High Availability Storage Infrastructure

John Gorman

By: John Gorman

September 25, 2007 5:32 pm

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By John C. Gorman

Help YOUR customers keep THEIR customers—with an especially stable foundation for SAP deployments

When SAP downtime spells disaster, high availability makes the difference.

Ask any customer about downtime on mission-critical systems such as SAP, and they’ll tell you. It’s entirely UNacceptable—every second offline costs their company time, money and even potentially customers. To protect essential business systems and enterprise bottom lines, customers need you to recommend and deliver reliable, high-availability IT infrastructures.

Fortunately, there’s a new high-availability sheriff in town, ready to save the day when customers run SAP NetWeaver technology on High Availability Storage Infrastructure—included in SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 from Novell.

Cluster software’s built-in, laying an especially firm foundation.

The crucial role of high availability, especially for SAP systems, is EXACTLY why SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 includes built-in cluster software. This provides a complete High Availability Storage Infrastructure, with all the features and functionality your customers need to ensure high SAP availability 24/7.

Under the hood and behind the scenes, High Availability Storage Infrastructure monitors the status of mission-critical system components—including the services required by the SAP software—and kick-starts failover to redundant servers if (or when) problems are detected.

Learn the “Big 5″ characteristics of enterprise-class solutions.

As a reseller, do you know the five primary characteristics of an enterprise-class solution? You can really help sell your customers—and increase solution sales—by committing these terms to memory:

  • High availability
  • Robustness
  • Manageability
  • Flexibility
  • Scalability

Not surprisingly, High Availability Storage Infrastructure combines all five attributes to deliver a complete solution for high-availability storage and cluster management. Based entirely on open-source, enterprise-class components, it integrates the following technologies:

  • Heartbeat version 2—a high-availability resource manager supporting multi-node failover
  • Oracle Cluster File System 2 (OCFS2)—a scalable parallel cluster file system
  • Enterprise Volume Management System (EVMS2)—a volume manager that’s “cluster-aware” and simplifies operations

It all adds up to a truly enterprise-class, high-availability platform to keep SAP apps running—along with your customers’ businesses.

A high-availability Resource Manager developed especially for SAP.

As the system’s Resource Manager, Heartbeat v2 lives up to its name, with a full spectrum of high-availability features, such as multi-node failover. Here’s just one example of how it works: by monitoring all server nodes within a cluster, it builds in redundancy and eliminates single points of failure.

Heartbeat v2 doesn’t just monitor nodes; it can also monitor services and applications. Resource monitors are built enabling the cluster manager to detect whether (or not) an application or service is running properly. And Service Pack 1 for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 provides two additional resource agents developed especially for use in an SAP high-availability cluster environment.

With additional dynamic resource dependency modeling, resource priorities and time-based rules, Heartbeat v2 even protects multi-tiered applications—such as SAP NetWeaver—which rely on multiple system components.

Customers trust you—tell them to consult the experts.

SAP NetWeaver isn’t for tech newbies. It’s sophisticated technology running on complex hardware to provide redundant network resources and storage. You’re STRONGLY encouraged to recommend that customer get expert consulting help when setting up a system to run SAP on Linux with High Availability Storage Infrastructure. In partnership with Novell and RealTech, SAP can provide a reference implementation of High Availability for SAP NetWeaver-based systems using SUSE Linux Enterprise Server with High Availability Storage Infrastructure.

In other words, as always, customers don’t need to go it alone—they’ve got you to turn to for all the answers they’ll need.

Additional resources.

O.K., so this all pretty heady stuff, but hey—you’re a technology expert, right?

So, as always, if you want to dig in and dive a bit deeper into learning more about how this high-availability solution can benefit your customers, plenty of great resources are available.

  • www.sap.com/platform/netweaver/index.epx
    Get more information on SAP NetWeaver, the foundation for Enterprise Services Architecture—SAP’s blueprint for services-based, enterprise-scale business solutions.
  • www.novell.com/products/server/
    Learn more about SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, the enterprise-quality server designed to handle mission-critical data-center workloads.
  • www.novell.com/sap
    Review the results of the joint project between SAP, Novell, RealTech, IBM and download a more detailed technical whitepaper on this post’s content.

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Categories: Expert Views, SUSE Linux Enterprise High Availability Extension, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server

Disclaimer: As with everything else at SUSE Conversations, this content is definitely not supported by SUSE (so don't even think of calling Support if you try something and it blows up).  It was contributed by a community member and is published "as is." It seems to have worked for at least one person, and might work for you. But please be sure to test, test, test before you do anything drastic with it.

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