SUSE Conversations


OpenStack Icehouse – Cool for Enterprises

Douglas Jarvis

By: Douglas Jarvis

April 17, 2014 11:13 am

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OpenStack Icehouse has arrived with spring, but this ninth release of the leading open source project for building Infrastructure-as-a-Service clouds won’t melt under user demands. This is good, since user interest in OpenStack seems to know no limits as evidenced by the three new and sixteen total languages in which OpenStack Dashboard is now available.

ice-houseSUSE congratulates the more than 1,200 contributors to OpenStack Icehouse for another on-time delivery of the open source software that is changing how IT and business work.

Delivering numerous enhancements to existing projects, the developer community has brought greater operational efficiency and increased code maturity and stability to OpenStack. However, Icehouse isn’t all about improving on past releases as demonstrated by the addition of the previously incubated Database Service (Trove) into the integrated release.

The OpenStack Database Service provides standard provisioning and management of scalable and reliable relational and non-relational database engines.Since most applications require a database, simplifying and speeding the installation process is a critical evolution that eliminates the need for users to manage their own installations.

As the provider of the enterprise OpenStack distribution SUSE Cloud, we are also happy to see the progress made on migration and updates. Enabling rolling upgrades of the cloud control structure is important for large-scale production deployments because enterprises need a consistent, simple way to manage the life cycles of their OpenStack clouds.

The enhancements to other core projects include improved scheduler performance, tighter integration of the Orchestration Service with other components, deeper Compute and Networking integration for software-defined networking (SDN), Identity Service federated authentication and additional VMware functionality, for example, using a datastore from the Image Service―all important features for our enterprise customers.

OpenStack is the heart of SUSE Cloud and work on integrating Icehouse has already begun in preparation for our next release in early summer. If you want to try out OpenStack Icehouse now, you can visit the Open Build Service, where the most up-to-date Icehouse packages are available for openSUSE 13.1 and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 11 SP3.

Check it out for yourself, and try SUSE Cloud to get your own private cloud solution started today.

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Categories: Announcements, Cloud Computing, Expert Views, SUSE Cloud, SUSE in the Cloud

Disclaimer: As with everything else at SUSE Conversations, this content is definitely not supported by SUSE (so don't even think of calling Support if you try something and it blows up).  It was contributed by a community member and is published "as is." It seems to have worked for at least one person, and might work for you. But please be sure to test, test, test before you do anything drastic with it.

1 Comment

  1. By:boblmartens

    Always good to see SUSE keeping up with the latest releases!

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